“30 Qs With…” Blog Series with Estefania Jomant

This month we continue our “30 Qs with…” blog series by getting to know Estefania Jomant, Digital Coordinator at StudioB. Every month we invite you to get to know Burson-Marsteller Miami’s talent from a different perspective – these 1:1 interviews will reveal personal anecdotes from their lives in and out of the office.

Estefania graduated from the University of Miami and is a big supporter of the Hurricanes. She enjoys kayaking, running, and the beach in her free time!

Get to know her better by checking out her interview here or watch it below! #30QsWith #BursonPersons

The Evolution of Hispanic Experiential Marketing

In the beginning, it was about showing up and hanging banners. That was the extent of experiential marketing in the 80s. It was a community relations function of Corporate Affairs departments. No need to show ROI.  Take a few pictures, put them in a recap, send it to the client and get glowing reviews, piece of cake. We all knew that no client would ever show up to a Hispanic event, particularly when they were in Brooklyn (when Brooklyn was Brooklyn), Orchard Beach, East LA, and the Rio Grande Valley. Vexing choices they had to make, the Hamptons for the weekend or Orchard Beach for an event, go figure.

Then came Calle Ocho Open House which, as Chef Emeril says, kicked it up a notch. The success of the first Calle Ocho quickly led to the expansion of the event to a weeklong celebration aptly branded Carnaval Miami. Along came Univision and its then overlord Televisa (funny how things don’t change) and presto, we have Noche de Carnaval being broadcast across the country and to Latin America with world class talent commanding world class dollars. They did it right. Carnaval Miami was the hottest marketing platform for the Hispanic market, being leveraged across the country by CPG companies as a destination event for Hispanics everywhere. But to Carnaval Miami, the clients came. They were spending big money and it didn’t hurt that it was in the Miami of Miami Vice fame, in winter with a tremenda fiesta at the Vizcaya to boot.

But then everyone started to do it. Fiesta Broadway in Los Angeles, Carnaval de Elizabeth in New Jersey and other shorter-lived versions cropped up here and there. They tried to replicate the model and instead ended up fragmenting and competing for national Hispanic event marketing dollars, which were scarce to begin with. Dollars started to shift from nationally funded to regional budgets, and that is pretty much where these community events are today.

Fast forward from the 80s and 90s to today, and with the vertiginous growth of the Hispanic market and the serious money that it entails, there is real scrutiny on Hispanic contributions to brands’ growth and ROI from Hispanic experiential initiatives. No longer is Hispanic-focused event marketing a function of the Corporate Affairs departments; they are now rightfully being evaluated and measured according to their potential contribution to the brands’ overall health. Here’s the good news: the overall strength of Hispanic-focused experiential marketing is solid. As experiential marketing continues to grow as a component to the overall marketing mix–according to a recent EventTrack study, 51% of brands surveyed will increase their experiential content spend this year– Hispanic focused events and experiential marketing initiatives have all the underpinnings of being able to contribute rich rewards to brands who venture into the Hispanic experiential arena.

Besides seeing more targeted and sophisticated activations across the Hispanic market, my optimism is anchored on two key factors. The first is that Hispanics are under exposed to experiential marketing initiatives as a community. While experiential marketing ranks #1 by Hispanics for driving purchase, generating word of mouth, personal engagement and learning about new products. Hispanics are underexposed to event marketing initiatives as a whole as brands leverage their limited (but growing) experiential dollars to the consumer segment they feel most comfortable with. Secondly, our propensity to over share everything on social media is fertile ground for consumer led event-related content development and ultimately, brand advocacy. Our challenge in the Experiential Marketing Industry is to keep the engagement compelling. I firmly believe we have all the tools to do so. If we build it they will come, share the experience, and reward the brands who reach out.

Pedro de Cordoba | Senior Director, Burson Latino

“30 Qs with…” Blog Series with Sofia Candelario

This month we continue our “30 Qs with…” blog series by getting to know Sofia Candelario, a Client Staff Assistant in our Innovation & Technology practice. Every month we invite you to get to know Burson-Marsteller Miami’s talent from a different perspective – these 1:1 interviews will reveal personal anecdotes from their lives in and out of the office.

Sofia, who is originally from Puerto Rico, got her Master’s degree from Syracuse University in upstate New York. She just celebrated her one-year anniversary of working at Burson-Marsteller Miami!

Get to know her better by checking out her interview here or watch it below! #30QsWith #BursonPersons

eMerge Americas Asserts Itself as a Tech Giant

I was born and raised in Miami, Florida, and as a Miami native, it makes me proud that Burson-Marsteller Miami was selected as the strategic communications agency for eMerge Americas, the premier technology conference that connects investors and technology industry leaders with revolutionary startups and cutting-edge ideas. In addition to getting ready the last few months, our team worked 24/7 at the Miami Beach Convention Center to ensure that we secure the deserved visibility for the conference, its sponsors, amazing speakers and entrepreneurs.

And for the first time we were introduced to Cxytera, which made its debut at the show. The multi-billion dollar Cyxtera, now based in Miami, brings together a global data center footprint and a modern, hybrid- and cloud-ready security portfolio. 

Loaded with high-profile speakers and innovative startup companies, eMerge Americas exceeded the expectations by drawing in hundreds of companies and innovators from around the world. Our Burson Miami team developed a comprehensive public relations strategy to help eMerge Americas become the tech event of the Americas.

Four years ago, eMerge held its first conference in Miami to an eager crowd. This year, attendees saw the likes of Apple Co-Founder Steve Wozniak, Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure, Waze co-founder Uri Levine,Armando Christian Perez (Pitbull), Suze Orman, Alex Rodriguez, and many other influential leaders speak on the conference’s main keynote stage. In addition to the Keynote Stage, eMerge hosted the WIT (Women in Technology) and eGov – Government Innovation summits, as well as Techxpert and a “Shark Tank” like Launchpad stage where investors got to hear from the latest entrepreneurs of all ages and backgrounds. More than 13,000 people attended the two-day conference.

During the event, there was a great deal of talk about Miami and how Silicon Valley is no longer the only place to find tech startups. Rony Abovitz, Founder and CEO of Magic Leap, and University of Miami Alum, talked about Miami as an emerging tech hub. When he speaks to people from Latin America, they talk about Miami like we talk about Silicon Valley, so there is definitely something going on here.

Uri Levine, one of the most prolific businessmen of today and an active angel investor in technology-based companies who sold Waze to Google, spoke about what it is like to start a company from the ground up.  He shared that in one day he would be both on top of the world, and crying later at night, like a rollercoaster. As part of his presentation, he also offered some tips for startups who are just getting their feet wet:

  • Understand who your users are and their perception of the product
  • Make mistakes, and make them fast so that you can fix them fast
  • The team that you are building and the mission that you define will define your journey
  • If you fall in love with the solution, you will forget about the problem
  • If you lose focus of the problem, then you are probably not doing the right thing

I would venture to say these tips are not just useful for startups, but for companies and leaders of all levels!

Joining us for all the action on the eMerge Americas floor was Rowan Benecke, Chair of Burson-Marsteller’s Global Technology Practice, who came here to spend time with eMerge leaders, other Burson Miami clients and our Miami Innovation and Technology team.

We continue to win and serve great clients such as eMerge Americas. Whether you’re looking for a new strategic communications partner, a digital PR strategy, an experiential marketing initiative or want to understand how your brand is perceived in the digital arena, Burson-Marsteller Miami can help you.

Speaking of digital, if you are in the Miami area on June 28, don’t forget to RSVP for our Breakfast With Burson series featuring relevant and timely discussion on who owns social in today’s dynamic and blurred marketing and communications climate.

If you would like to learn more, please feel free to contact me via e-mail or LinkedIn. I look forward to sharing how our employees are helping to elevate the City of Miami to new heights. 

Jorge Ortega | Executive Vice-President

Social Media Killed the Advertising Star

As the influence of social media continues to rise in our everyday lives, advertising campaigns are being heavily scrutinized even before they hit your television set. Viewers are taking to Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and other forms of social media to voice their opinions on specific advertisements.

Recently, McDonald’s released an advertisement that received a ton of backlash on social media. As part of the campaign, McDonald’s depicted a young boy reminiscing with his mother about his deceased father. As the boy and his mother tried to find something in common, they both realized that the boy ordered the same fish sandwich in McDonald’s that his late father would order. Social media users from around the U.S. weighed in, so as part of a special segment in my Burson-Bulletin series, I asked three of my colleagues from Burson-Marsteller Miami to answer some questions that I had on the subject. I weighed in as well.

Rodrigo Castro, Group Director, Ivan Ruiz, Senior Digital Strategist and Head of StudioB, and Pedro de Cordoba, Senior Director of Burson Latino, all participated.

Q & A:

Q. First things first, how do you combat this situation if you’re a company receiving this type of backlash?

  • Rodrigo: Nothing but prevention. Companies are under a lot of pressure to increase sales and revenue in an increasingly competitive market. Increasing brand awareness is becoming more difficult, particularly with audiences exposed to millions of messages through thousands of media platforms. This pressure is translated to develop more engaging messages, sometimes what could be considered as borderline tacky or unacceptable from consumers. Focus groups are not enough to test messages: common sense is always a must.
  • Pedro: There must be a balance between a speedy response and a well thought out one. However, the initial reaction should always have a humble tone and demeanor, projecting transparency.
  • Ivan: Sometimes you have to take the good with the bad. A good crisis management strategy and a strong social media guidelines document come in very handy whenever “backlash” appears in the same sentence as your brand.

This is a tough one. Companies like a McDonald’s usually conduct focus groups to test creative concepts and commercials. If they did not do it in this case, they missed an opportunity to gauge consumer reactions.  In the event that you did everything to test the creative concept and you still get this backlash, then it is best to be honest and admit what your intentions were and apologize for offending anyone.

Q. Are advertising companies “going too far” with some of these advertisements?

  • Rodrigo: Yes and no. As I clearly stated before, companies are under a lot of pressure to develop differentiated messages that sometimes cross the line. But as we understand, McDonald’s and Pepsi did not receive backlash in sales – which is what matters most. People will still buy their Big Macs and their Pepsi drinks. Amid a competitive market and saturated channels with different brand messages, are these “backlash strategies” done on purpose to put the brand back in the spotlight?
  • Pedro: Advertising companies only go as far as the clients allow them to. That said, if they screwed up, the best option is to own up to it and learn from the experience.
  • Ivan: I think advertisers are doing their best. They pressure test everything they put out there, but sometimes you strike a chord with the wrong group, and the rest is history.

Look, from my vantage point I think brands are always trying to touch consumers’ hearts AND minds. No creative person ever wants to manipulate emotions or offend their target audience. I think marketers are dealing with a highly cluttered and competitive environment and trying to differentiate their value proposition, message and story while staying relevant. Sometimes they miss the mark.

Q. As we think about the rise of social media and its influence on everyday lives, how do you feel social media affects advertisers and their mindset behind how they come up with ads?

  • Rodrigo: Buzz is everything. Even if it’s a bad buzz, the brand will continue to be on the spot. I recently flew United for a trip to the west coast. While I was expecting to see some empty seats as a backlash of their recent crisis, the truth is both flights, inbound and outbound, were completely packed! Did United lose revenue? Most certainly. But they will recover quickly if flights continue to be packed.
  • Pedro: I think the rise of social media has enormous influence in day-to-day perception management. However, the proclivity to react in a knee jerk fashion, tempted by access to social media sometimes runs the risk of reacting without thinking things through. It seems we are constantly reminded of this.
  • Ivan: Advertisers are uber-aware of the power of social media. They push the envelope in hopes that their ad will be the next viral hit, but “virality” is a double-edged sword. Some brands can afford to take chances like this… the Pepsis and McDonalds of the world can take the good with the bad. At the end of the day, I believe people will still drink Pepsi and eat Big Macs. Smaller companies don’t have those luxuries, and as marketers, we need to be conscious of that.

I personally feel that social media has become the gathering place for consumers and brands to interact. It is also the free outlet where consumers and other stakeholders can complain, praise or comment on brands, companies, customer experience and much more. Advertisers today have to recognize that whatever media they plan to place their message in, consumers and others will use social media to discuss it, whether they like it or not.

Q. We saw the backlash that happened with Pepsi’s ad and now McDonald’s, what strategies are they using in their advertisements that just don’t seem to be working?

  • Rodrigo: Are we sure they are not working?
  • Pedro: I think sometimes in the rush to be relevant, we sin of being “overly relevant”
  • Ivan: In the quest to be contextually relevant, advertisers are leaning more and more on current events to serve as the mechanism that delivers their message. Unfortunately, when you play in that space, there is always the risk of polarizing certain audience groups.

It’s interesting, because even the most tested and proven concepts can experience backlash. By the time the campaign hits the air, many layers have approved it, from the c-suite to smart marketing professionals, to legal and many others. I do believe that sometimes there is an element of bad luck and marketers need to anticipate the worst and be prepared to manage communications around it.

Q. How can companies take advantage of social media to help create better advertisements and public relations for themselves?

  • Rodrigo: The goal of an advertisement is to increase “top-of-mind awareness” in the hope it will eventually drive sales; I don’t think these cases we have been analyzing here were far from that original goal. They didn’t drive positive reactions, but they managed to bring their brands to the top of consumers’ minds, which is something that is extremely hard to get nowadays.
  • Pedro: In order to maximize social, you need to be topical, and above all timely.
  • Ivan: Companies should leverage social media to put forward a consistent message so that when situations like this occur, brands have an established history and a reputation they can lean on.

The way I see it is social media is an important channel. No intelligent marketer today can or should ignore using social media as part of a marketing or communications strategic plan.

Q. Companies are pulling ads before they hit the mainstream, what kind of strategies need to be implemented prior to releasing an advertisement on the web so that this doesn’t happen?

  • Rodrigo: Again, I do believe this is part of a new strategy. Companies may look for this to happen. I like to think of it as a controlled risk – teams are ready to work on reputation issues while revenues increase.
  • Ivan: I’m not sure this can be avoided. Very large focus groups carry a hefty price-tag, but smaller groups may not include enough variety.

Actually, we recommend clients imagine different possible scenarios and plan communications responses around each of those scenarios.  They need an outside point of view from experts not involved in the campaign development to consider possible reactions from consumers and plan accordingly.

Q. A company like McDonald’s or Pepsi will be able to bounce back from this due to the size of their company, but how would a small company bounce back from this?

  • Rodrigo: It all has to do with corporate reputation. No small company is ready to take controlled risks to jeopardize its reputation for some increase in sales. It takes years for large corporate monsters to be ready to walk the line.
  • Pedro: Think about what you want to say, a few times before you do.
  • Ivan: A smaller company needs to manage their risk-vs-reward strategy when it comes to advertising so that they aren’t exposed to these situations as frequently.

I believe it is the same process for both, it is imperative that any company considers possible scenarios in advance and creates contingency response strategies.

Q. Finally, if you had to give advice to young professionals about these situations, what would you tell them?

  • Rodrigo: Be bold, be cautious, but also be creative. Social media audience is hypocritical: today they cherish a video of a two-legged dog because “OMG how cute”, tomorrow they will slash the same video because “somebody” said they tortured the dog to do it – but in the meantime, the video reaches a million views in 24 hours. Amid message saturation in traditional and digital media, companies may use this risky, yet efficient way of promoting themselves. Could it work again?
  • Pedro: Think before you do anything.
  • Ivan: Marketing is like a carefully choreographed interpretive dance. It’s beautiful when everyone is in sync, but can appear messy and disjointed when the parts do not come together as they should. As marketers, we want to push the envelope for our clients, but we need to be sure that the message is on strategy and will resonate with the majority of our audience – you’ll never please everyone, and you have to be prepared to mess up your dance every once in a while.

For every young professional who is just starting out, do not give up on being creative. Consider different scenarios and balance the need to differentiate and be relevant with possible consumer and stakeholder responses.

Jorge Ortega, Executive Vice-President

The Burson Difference: Know-how and Know-who

Integration is often defined as the inverse of differentiation, but in the case of Burson-Marsteller, it actually sets us apart. As a global strategic communications firm, our main asset is our seamless worldwide network of 77 offices and 85 affiliates, operating in 110 countries across six continents. This breadth grants us access to the top communications experts around the world – not only within our own firm, but across Young & Rubicam and all WPP companies – to ensure we deliver the best results for our clients with the best team suited to do the job. We have both the know-how and know-who in terms of matching talent and respective skill-sets with clients’ needs.

We recently put this to the test when helping a global company address sensitive regulatory and legislative issues on health and wellness. We coordinated a team of public affairs and crisis management experts in multiple countries with the experience to make a difference. By coordinating issues and events around the world, we developed a strategic communications plan to satisfy the client.

In another case, when one of our clients realized how much we can do to help it leverage social media to reach key stakeholders, they asked our StudioB team, led by Ivan Ruiz, to develop a comprehensive strategy that is generating new levels of engagement for the brand through one of its key executives in the Latin American market.

Uniquely positioned in a market considered the Bridge to the Americas, Burson-Marsteller Miami not only serves clients across the Southeast U.S. and Latin America, it is also the headquarters for Burson Latino, our U.S. Hispanic specialty team. We offer a team of multicultural, multilingual professionals who are on in tune with what is happening not only in our own backyard, but across the U.S. and Latin American regions, thanks to close collaboration with our colleagues who provide us with the local intelligence and depth we need to make client campaigns targeted, relevant and effective. This “always-connected” model contributes to what I call the Burson Difference.

Aside from our established presence and long-term commitment to the markets in which we operate, we also rely on a varied talent mix of senior, experienced leadership and young and eager professionals who bring a fresh perspective on how to apply our results-driven business process to achieve client goals.

These are just some of the characteristics that set Burson-Marsteller apart. I am proud of the work we are doing for our local, regional and global clients, knowing that connectivity and reach allow us to assemble the right team at any given time, keeping this business, and my role here, very exciting.  It is a wonderful time to be leading our business from the Miami vantage point and to be the bridge for our clients to the Burson know-who and know-how.

If you would like to learn more, please feel free to contact me via e-mail or LinkedIn. I look forward to sharing how our employees, not only in Miami, but around the world are truly living the Burson Difference.

Jorge Ortega, Executive Vice-President

“30 Qs with…” Blog Series with Jennefer Melendez

This month we continue our “30 Qs with…” blog series by getting to know Jennefer Melendez, a Senior Associate working with Burson Latino. Every month we invite you to get to know Burson-Marsteller Miami’s talent from a different perspective – these 1:1 interviews will reveal personal anecdotes from their lives in and out of the office.

Jennefer, who started with Burson-Marsteller Miami recently, opens up about her love for public relations and what she enjoys most about honing her craft every day. 

Get to know her better by checking out her interview here or watch it below! #30QsWith #BursonPersons

The Inevitability of Multiculturalism

It’s happening and there is no turning back.

Face it folks, short of a massive and prolonged vow of chastity by millions of hyphenated Americans, the move to a majority multicultural society will happen in 2042, if not sooner. No walls, extreme vetting or English-only requirements can slow down the inevitability of this fact, and it is indeed an empirical fact. The good news is, that it is all good news.

Companies in search of growth -which means every company- should be midwifing this process and weaving themselves into relevancy as the fabric of society changes. All companies should take a more assertive stance and cast their lot with the future as opposed to being held hostage to the past. Lots of them are doing it already, being consistent in their approach to better align with these demographic realities, others not so much. There will be winner and losers.

Our American society is well on its way to becoming a much more colorful and interesting place. It is sure to become more tolerant and inclusive, a reflection of the values already seen with Millennials and Gen Z’ers that will rule in our not so distant future. American kitchens will be teeming with scents of sriracha, chile ancho, curry and turmeric, accented by dashes of salsa – the condiment and the music – and everyone will be humming a future version of la Macarena or Despacito. We’ll hear a potpourri of different languages mixed with English como Spanglish, our very own American patois. While this linguistic convergence might not work for purists, it will surely be understood in our city streets, and that’s a good thing. This multilingualism will help nurture our ability to communicate with peoples all over the globe, and that can’t hurt either.

Everybody has a story

Except for Native Americans, everyone else with immigrant roots has a story to tell about how and why they or their people came to America in search of… (“insert reason here”). I seriously doubt anyone would put a government handout as the driver that made them brave the perils they faced as a reason to land on these shores.

America has been rightfully sold to the world as the land of opportunity. An opportunity is not much to bank on, it’s just a chance. To leave it all behind to risk life and limb for a mere chance took guts in the 1800’s and 1900’s and it sure takes guts today. The reason that America is a magnet for people willing to assume crazy risks is precisely because there is proof that you indeed get an opportunity. It might be uneven, it’s certainly not fair, but it’s a chance. In many places around the world an opportunity is way too much to ask for, not here.

Our multiculturalism should be a proof point

Today the multicultural nature of our society has become a proof point rather than a talking point. It has in fact reached critical mass with no way back. There are numbers (lots of them as a matter of fact), metrics that one can chart, track, analyze and project accurately into the future. In a nutshell, 37% of people in America today are non-white with a hockey-stick-like slope for accelerated growth. And guess what? Arguably in the larger scheme of things, we all kind of get along. There is a fragility in this balancing act; one that seems to improve with the passing of generations. But many are still standing idle on the sidelines. Many more brands should play a role if they want to be relevant to the new American mainstream and for the life of me, I don’t see it happening to the level it should despite the inevitability of it all.

What a difference a few years make 

I recall the days when no auto manufacturer or dealer would bother to advertise new vehicles to Hispanics. We would inevitably be sent to the used car lot, and then treated with a healthy dose of suspicion. Today, they are tripping all over themselves trying to reach our market. In 2015, the biggest sales year the auto industry has ever seen, Hispanics alone accounted for 35 percent of new vehicle sales growth, per CDK Global.

When will the fear of white backlash end?

Still, entire industries lag in their outreach efforts-some driven by sheer inertia but others driven by what we in the Hispanic and multicultural marketing spheres call the “white backlash”. Unfortunately, many companies are paralyzed by the fear of this backlash. Lots of them are laying low, hoping the unseemly atmospherics of bigotry and nativism unleashed since the 2016 election will quiet down. But this aggrieved segment of society will not go gentle into that good night. They’re disoriented and mad. What will marketers do? Will they continue to sit on the sidelines and kowtow to a dwindling and aging segment of society that temporarily feels empowered, as they are collectively preparing to kick the proverbial bucket? Or embrace a forward-looking optimistic populace who saw the opportunity of America, and took it?

Pedro de Cordoba, Senior Director | Burson Latino

Engagement Pursuit

As time goes by and technology advances at the speed of light, brands face bigger challenges around not only how to communicate with their audiences, but most importantly, how to keep them engaged with what they do. Marketers and communication experts only have a few seconds to capture their target’s attention so they can communicate the right message, to the right people, at the right time.

So how can brands capture their audience within the social media frenzy?

First and foremost, they should know WHO they are talking to and WHAT are they interested in – from hobbies and music, to social media preferences and lifestyle. Once this is identified prepare for some creative thinking, brainstorming, and remember there are no bad ideas – everything could potentially lead to an AHA moment!

Now that you have your idea clear, what’s the story? How can you tell it in one simple piece of content? Identify five elements in your story and write them down. Select the platform and format that better converges the audience’s preferences, the brand, and the untold story. Maybe this piece should be a video or a cinemagraph to increase reach, and since the content is highly relevant, pay-to-play! Investment in social media advertising will directly reflect in your results, and therefore your KPIs. This means you’ll have more eyes seeing your content and engaging with it.

Lastly, and definitely one of the most important parts: measure and optimize. You’ve already invested all this time and effort in creating a masterpiece, so now it is time to measure the results, analyze what went well, and decide if there is room for improvement or even replicating the concept and story in other platforms or formats.

The engagement pursuit is a never-ending marathon for digital marketers. What engages your audience today, might not work tomorrow. Stay connected. Stay digital!

Lucia Zazueta, Digital Strategist | Senior Associate 

Thinking Globally, Acting Locally: Earth Week 2017

Earth Week, April 16-22, was started in the 1970s by grassroots organizers who wanted to encourage learning of environmental issues. Every year, during this time, school children learn about the diversity of ecosystems found around the world, while being taught how their actions can have a lasting impact on Mother Earth.

But after we enter the “real world”, Earth Week tends to go unnoticed and uncelebrated as people get caught up in their client work and fast approaching deadlines. However, as a self-proclaimed environmentalist, I wondered, “Can we make Earth Week relevant again by bringing issues affecting our local South Florida environment to the office’s day-to-day activities?”

That thought inspired me to consider a new approach for this year’s Earth Week and invite Burson-Marsteller Miami to get in touch with their inner school-child by taking an interest in relevant issues found south of Lake Okeechobee. As one of the organizers of the Earth Week activities, my goal was to get people out of the office and outside to interact with our main attraction: the ocean.

The Green Team, as I dubbed the Burson Miami Earth Week organizers, planned an ocean clean-up at a local Miami beach where instead of our normal Friday happy hour we went to Hobie Island Beach Park, located on Virginia Key. With the sun in our faces and sand between our toes, we set out to collect foreign items such as plastic bottles, cigarette butts, bottle caps, and other waste. About 14 people (and two four-legged assistants!) participated in the clean-up, removing close to 15lbs of trash off the beach.

On Monday April 24th, following the beach clean-up, my fellow Green Team member, Nicholas Komisarjevsky, and I prepared a presentation to inform our colleagues about the ever imminent threat of Sea Level Rise in South Florida through a Lunch and Learn. We concluded our presentation by providing each team member with a reusable plastic bottle, acrylic paints, and inspiration to decorate their bottles as they see fit, in an effort to cut down on the office’s plastic water bottle waste.

The key message that I tried to impart to my peers through our Earth Week initiative was the importance of thinking globally, while acting locally. As a global Public Relations and Communications agency, Burson-Marsteller always looks to provide our clients with culturally relevant and locally focused support. We utilize our global network to share ideas, talent, and perspectives while giving our clients a boutique agency feel. We think globally, but act locally.

I think that provides a great parallel to the importance of Earth Week because it reminds us to focus on the small details in order to spur greater change. Deciding to tackle climate change alone can be a daunting task. However, choosing to use ceramic mug for your morning coffee instead of a disposable paper cup is manageable. Perhaps getting the office to stop printing documents is unrealistic, but instead of simply throwing the pages away after their singular use, considering upcycling them into a notebook is doable. Thus encouraging the office to consider how their daily actions have a larger environmental impact.

As the world continues to get smaller through enhanced communication abilities, we must think globally, but we cannot forget to act locally. Together, making more conscious efforts to do our part in lessening our carbon footprint can act as the catalyst to larger changes.

As April comes to an end, I challenge everyone to not forget about the meaning of Earth Week. The realities of global warming, sea level rise, and other environmental issues are pertinent every day, especially in South Florida. While Earth Week encourages us to focus on the importance of the environment, it is critical that we adopt sustainable habits like reducing, reusing, and recycling to lessen our carbon footprint globally. Individual contributions do make an impact. Share below with your commitment to Earth and the environment for the coming year.

#EarthWeek2017

Kelsey Flitter, Public Affairs Practice

Fake News, Really?

The concept of “fake news” has taken the world by storm over the past year and a half. What started out as a hot topic during the 2016 U.S. Presidential election has turned into a full-blown phenomenon, capturing the attention of media, corporate America, and the world. Being in the business of reputation management we cannot take this lightly, and we want to ensure that our clients are prepared to recognize fake news and effectively communicate their initiatives.

Companies are doing everything they can to streamline news that appears on their webpage, in an effort to minimize the risk of false information making its way onto the site. In addition, Google is making changes to its search algorithm to promote “authoritative” content versus “low quality,” securing confidence in users that when they google search for answers, the information they are getting is accurate and sound.

In an attempt to combat this situation, Burson-Marsteller has announced an effort to protect clients against concerns raised by the trending topic of fake news and reinforce the integrity of their own communications activities. The team will consist of former journalists working at the firm as well as independent former media and will conduct the following:

·      Webinars to share best practices on how to combat fake news

·      Online Q&A forum where clients can ask questions

·      Quarterly webchats

·      Information on best practices posted on the firm’s Intranet

We want to ensure that our clients have access to top insights on how to spot fake news, vet information they come across, and preserve the integrity of the content they promote. Burson-Marsteller is always at the forefront of tackling the big issues, and this is no exception.

For more information about this new initiative or if you would like to learn more about what we are doing at Burson-Marsteller, please don’t hesitate to message or email me.

Jorge Ortega

“30 Qs with…” Blog Series with Bruno Giordano

This month we continue our “30 Qs with…” blog series by getting to know Bruno Giordano, a Client Executive working in the Public Affairs Department. Every month we invite you to get to know Burson-Marsteller Miami’s talent from a different perspective – these 1:1 interviews will reveal personal anecdotes from their lives in and out of the office.

Bruno, who enjoys going to the beach in Miami, is mainly based in Honduras where he enjoys the beautiful nature.

Get to know him better by checking out his interview here or watch it below! #30QsWith #BursonPersons

Burson-Marsteller Hires Tom Eslinger as New Global Chief Creative Officer (CCO)


Dear friends and colleagues:

I am proud to let you know that Burson-Marsteller has hired world-renowned and internationally awarded executive creative director Tom Eslinger as Global Chief Creative Officer (CCO).

Before joining Burson-Marsteller, Tom was consulting Executive Creative Director for visual effects and virtual reality firm Framestore’s integrated advertising efforts. Before that, he spent 13 years in the Saatchi & Saatchi network, eight of which as Worldwide Digital Creative Director. In that role, he led digital creative direction and strategy on global new business and client initiatives, identified creative production partnerships and talent recruitment and led cross-network partnerships via the Publicis Groupe, serving on its Worldwide Creative Board of Directors for 10 years.

A firm like Burson-Marsteller is no longer to be thought of as just doing PR – the lines between advertising, branding, media and public relations have blurred in recent years, and while we are always looking to move the needle when it comes to creative ideas and innovative communications solutions that will drive business results. We are excited to have Tom bring a new level of creativity to our team and our clients.

Here in Miami, we are very proud of the innovative work being done to continue fostering that creative integration. This month, we partnered with Juan Valdez, the Colombian coffee grower’s brand dedicated to offering an authentic Colombian Premium coffee experience, to launch the #InspiredbyJuanValdez campaign, ahead of its sponsorship of the Miami Open. Our team was up to the challenge of generating awareness and enthusiasm around a brand, primarily known to Hispanic audiences, among the general market in South Florida. As a renowned international art hub, Miami provided the perfect backdrop for our team to find inspiration for this creative campaign, linking coffee, art and tennis lovers to the brand experience. Our team kicked it off with a media blitz across local newsrooms with Juan Valdez himself, to share news on a series of immersive activations at Juan Valdez cafés, where fans painted three panels that eventually came together as a mural unveiled during the tennis tournament. From in-store player appearances, on-site giveaways, and a VIP art gallery style reception, to an on-court activation featuring a trip to Colombia’s Ruta del Café, this integrated experiential campaign before, during, and after the Miami Open, helped build momentum for future Juan Valdez store openings across South Florida later this year.

Also, Ivan Ruiz continues to lead our StudioB data analytics and content distribution team, comprised of analysts, strategists, creatives, and social media experts who produce data driven creative content for distribution across all traditional and digital platforms. Our rigorous commitment to highly creative, integrated communications is setting Burson-Marsteller Miami apart in the market.

We are excited to collaborate with Tom and look forward to the new ideas he will bring to our work. Please join me in welcoming Tom to the Burson-Marsteller family.

Let us know if you would like to learn more about how we are working with Tom and Ivan to bring the best thinking and ideas to our clients.

Best,

Jorge Ortega

Burson-Marsteller Miami Welcomes Back Alumni

Burson-Marsteller has always valued the people who work, and have worked, at the firm. To show our appreciation, we hosted the first ever Burson-Marsteller Miami Alumni Reunion that brought together former employees from the past 20 years on Thursday, March 30, 2017. Alumni from all over the state of Florida made their way to our outdoor courtyard overlooking the Miami skyline, for a night filled with music, hors d’oeuvres, cocktails, and fun.

Ramiro Prudencio, President and CEO of Burson-Marsteller Latin America as well as Jorge Ortega, Executive Vice President, made welcome remarks, thanking guests for their contributions to our organization and being part of our story, and reminding them that at the core, we are all #BursonPersons united by a common bond shared at different moments in time: excellence. We pride ourselves in delivering outstanding client service when it comes to developing and executing creative and strategic communications campaigns, and this event provided a platform to connect with our alumni, who are either former clients, current clients, or clients we’d love to partner with and deliver this message.

We invite you to check out this highlight reel, produced by our digital content, creative, and video production team – Studio B, recapping the night’s festivities, which also included a raffle, featuring  Miami Marlins bobble heads, ESPN gift bags, and Pitbull/Enrique Iglesias concert tickets among the nearly dozen prizes handed out.

Alumni hit the dance floor and enjoyed reminiscing and catching up with former leaders, colleagues, and friends, while greeting some of our current talent.   We would like to give a special shout out to our sponsors and event partners – BusinessWire, Gilbert’s Bakery, Bacardi, and the Miami Marlins – for helping this event be a success. Through a combination of food, drinks, beautiful weather, and great gifts you all helped make this evening a memorable one. Many thanks!

To all of our alumni who were able to attend, thank you. Hope to see you again next year!

Relive the event with this video here:

 

Multicultural Marketing Executive Pedro de Cordoba Joins Burson Latino

Burson-Marsteller, a leading global strategic communications and public relations firm, today announced that Pedro de Cordoba has joined Burson Latino, the firm’s specialty group that connects clients with the growing U.S. Latino marketplace, as a Senior Director.

Burson Latino supports clients with its evidence-based approach to communications and engagement with Latino and diverse communities. Complementing the agency’s own resources is a network of Community Communications Partners (CCP) in top multicultural markets who have a deep understanding of these communities, their stakeholders, the media and digital influencers. de Cordoba will help teams leverage these resources and others to build tailored communications campaigns that will connect clients with desired Hispanic audiences and drive business results.

de Cordoba, who is based in Miami, has more than 25 years of experience working for companies targeting the nation’s multicultural markets, including EVENTUS, Accentmarketing and LearningSoft, LLC. At EVENTUS, he served as Chief Strategy Officer responsible for the overall creative strategic development of multicultural strategies for clients and focused on growing the business through experiential marketing, sports and entertainment programs. Before that, he served as Vice President of Strategic Brand Extensions at Hispanic marketing agency, Accentmarketing, where he played an integral role in the development and implementation of strategic marketing programs for clients. In addition, he was instrumental in developing sports and entertainment-related platforms for Major League Baseball and the FIFA World Cup, along with recording artists including Mana, Enrique Iglesias, Juan Luis Guerra and Pitbull. When he was Chief Marketing Officer of Internet start-up LearningSoft, which provides educational entertainment for children in the U.S., Europe and Latin America, de Cordoba developed all the go-to market strategies and led fundraising roadshow presentations with the CEO.

“I am thankful for the opportunity to lead the Burson Latino team, and excited to work alongside a top-notch team of professionals, each bringing unique insights, ideas and experiences to the table,” said de Cordoba. “An ever-growing multicultural marketplace breeds new business opportunities, and I look forward to tapping into my strategic planning, public relations and experiential marketing experience to capitalize on these opportunities and help grow Burson Latino.”

Read the full press release here